Slide Show Supplement to Mátra Power Plant, Visonta, Hungary

The Mátra Power Plant in Visonta, Hungary, uses a dense slurry system for handling fly ash and other coal combustion residuals. The DSS combines ash and water in a 1:1 ratio, creating a cement-like slurry.

The Mátra Power Plant in Visonta, Hungary, uses a dense slurry system (DSS) for handling fly ash and other coal combustion residuals. The DSS combines ash and water in a 1:1 ratio, creating a cement-like slurry. Ash enters the top of the system through the ash feeder (top). Courtesy: Enexio Ash and water are combined in the premixer (bottom) and sent to the mixing tank below. Courtesy: Enexio In the mixing tank, the slurry is combined using centrifugal pumps, rather than mechanical agitation. Courtesy: Enexio In addition to fly ash, other solid residuals are mixed into the slurry after it leaves the mixing tank. These include bottom ash, coarse ash from the economizer and air heaters, and gypsum from the FGD system. Courtesy: Enexio The slurry is pumped from the mixer building (upper left, behind the blue thickening tanks) across the plant site through the pipelines in the foreground to the landfill. Courtesy: Enexio Careful mixing and control of the ash-water ratio keeps the slurry pumpable. Courtesy: Enexio Once in the landfill, the slurry rapidly settles and begins to solidify. Courtesy: Enexio Eventually, the slurry forms a solid, cement-like substance. About a third of the water used drains out the bottom of the landfill as leachate. The remainder is bound up with the ash or evaporates. Courtesy: Enexio As each layer of ash solidifies, it is covered in gravel. Courtesy: Enexio Each layer forms a tier for the landfill, and the solidified ash is used to prepare the next tier above. Courtesy: Enexio The ash-stone is excavated around the perimeter to form the dike that will contain the next layer of slurry. The dike is then landscaped. Courtesy: Enexio Before transitioning to the DSS, Mátra used a simple dry landfill, which suffered from severe fugitive dust problems. Courtesy: Enexio The new landfill keeps the ash contained and has eliminated fugitive dust. Courtesy: Enexio When the landfill reaches maximum height, it is capped off. One retired landfill has been used as the site for a 16-MW solar plant. Courtesy: Enexio
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The Mátra Power Plant in Visonta, Hungary, uses a dense slurry system (DSS) for handling fly ash and other coal combustion residuals. The DSS combines ash and water in a 1:1 ratio, creating a cement-like slurry. Ash enters the top of the system through the ash feeder (top). Courtesy: Enexio