POWER [May, 15 2007]

Cover Stories

A rearview mirror and bright headlights

  This month's issue of POWER commemorates 125 years of continuous publishing for the power generation business. The anniversary gives us all a chance to assess where we've been and…

The history of POWER is the history of power

This month we officially commemorate the 125th anniversary of the magazine that has been essential reading for owners and operators of power generating plants. As you read this brief history, you'll see that—although we're looking back at an illustrious past—the secret of POWER's success has been its commitment to the future. As we look forward to the next milestone anniversary, we anticipate covering the latest developments in a new generation of power technologies. As always, our mission is to provide the best information and advice in the service of safely and efficiently powering the global energy industry.

Features

Controlling shaft voltages

Contrary to public belief, the most common electrical phenomenon produced by a power plant's steam turbines, turbine-driven compressors, and pumps isn't sparks or lightning bolts. It's static electricity. The physical effects of static electricity—greater vibration and higher temperatures—can damage bearings, shaft journals, couplings, and gears enough to cause a forced outage. A few inexpensive instruments in the hands of a well-trained technician can prevent "frosting" and "worm tracks" in your babbitt bearings. We'll start the training right now.

Could SuperCables deliver both hydrogen and electricity via a SuperGrid?

Transporting large quantities of electric power over long distances via superconducting DC cables was first considered more than 40 years ago by two IBM scientists. With the recent advent of long-length commercial high-temperature superconductors (HTSCs) and the desire to move the U.S. to a hydrogen-based economy, SuperCables could revolutionize the marketing of electricity. Using HTSCs cooled by hydrogen, a SuperCable could simultaneously deliver electricity and hydrogen to end users for domestic and industrial consumption and to power fuel cell cars.

DG interconnection standards remain elusive

The state of interconnection standards for distributed generation plants remains disconcerting to many prospective owners of such plants. IEEE 1547 has been in place for several years and appears to be the best option in a field of competing standards. But IEEE 1547 is an imperfect standard; it holds at least six holes. Here are some suggestions for filling them.

Experts ponder future of biomass industry

This month we officially commemorate the 125th anniversary of the magazine that has been essential reading for owners and operators of power generating plants. As you read this brief history, you'll see that—although we're looking back at an illustrious past—the secret of POWER's success has been its commitment to the future. As we look forward to the next milestone anniversary, we anticipate covering the latest developments in a new generation of power technologies. As always, our mission is to provide the best information and advice in the service of safely and efficiently powering the global energy industry.

Marmy's Egyptian nightmare

Steve Elonka began chronicling the exploits of Marmaduke Surfaceblow—a six-foot-four marine engineer with a steel-brush mustache and a foghorn voice—in POWER in 1948, when he raised the wooden mast of the SS Asia Sun with the help of two cobras and a case of Sandpaper Gin. Marmy's simple solutions to seemingly intractable plant problems remain timeless. This story originally appeared in 1950. Two years later, one of its key characters, King Farouk, abdicated the Egyptian throne to his infant son following a military coup.

Reduce stress with proper on-line rotor temperature monitoring

On-line temperature monitoring of steam turbine rotors must be based on modeling thermodynamic processes—not direct temperature measurements. Good operating decisions can significantly extend the life of aging turbines, particularly those that are routinely cycled or operated at their maximum ramp rates.

This month in POWER…

May 1885 POWER reported on the latest Twist Automatic Engine (Figure 1) in its cover story for the May 1885 issue. The editor explained that "each end of the cylinder…

Transfer ABWR construction techniques to U.S. shores

Advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) construction practices honed in Japan aren't just impressive, they're also eminently suitable for the fleet of new units planned for the U.S. Conceptually, these techniques show the transition from "construction" to "manufacturing" that has already taken place in other industries.

Water chemistry an important factor to consider for cycling HRSGs

Operators of combined-cycle plants that have been pressed into cycling service should make sure that the aqueous diet of their steam generators—especially heat-recovery steam generators—fits the plants' more active lifestyle. Following are some tips for keeping your HRSGs' water treatment regimen in tip-top shape. These prescriptions can keep the units vital longer and make them subject to fewer unexpected failures.

Departments

Commentary

Keep grid modernization a national priority

  As the possibility of national climate change legislation increases on Capitol Hill and captures the attention of the electric power community, I am concerned that regulators, legislators, and utility…

New Products

Legal & Regulatory

States should cede control of renewable power to regional markets

  State policy makers are characteristically reluctant to recognize that they have advanced a policy as far as they can, and that they must cede some control to fully realize…

Focus on O&M

Focus on O&M (May 2007)

 

Cyber security and the grid; Harnessing the Yangtze;

Hydraulic system overhaul;

O&M problems not caused by cycling;


Global Monitor

Global Monitor (May 2007)

World's largest PV plant now in Portugal; latan 2 construction may resume; Allegheny to scrub Fort Martin plant; TVA will clean up big Dutch CC plant; Connecticut blesses six fuel cell projects; DOE approves IGCC plant in Florida; FERC relicenses Osage hydro plant; A nanotech perpetual motion machine?; POWER digest

Speaking of Power

Not your grandfather's power industry

  In 1882, Americans talked of John L. Sullivan, the bare-knuckles boxing heavyweight champion of the world, as horse-drawn carriages jingled along city streets. The spidery cables of the Brooklyn…

GBR Reports