1950s_POWERExcerpt

1950s: The 1950s were marked by so many dazzling technical achievements in coal, gas, nuclear, and solar power technology, and POWER’s issues were crowded with important announcements and breakthroughs. One article declares: “Recent announcements reveal we’re at the start of a great stride forward in power-plant conditions—a move into the region far above the critical pressure. For years our attention centered on the steady advance of throttle temperature.” Another fascinating piece describes separate initiatives by General Electric and Westinghouse Electric Corp. to secure federal backing for construction of a large-capacity power reactor. Westinghouse’s full-scale 60-MW plant will cost “tens of millions of dollars,” POWER notes. 

In the 1950s, POWER lost one of its longest-running chief editors, Philip Swain. Swain’s 20-year legacy remains part of a remarkable and significant feature of the magazine’s history, which is that it had only five editors-in-chief throughout its first 100 years of publication. So much would have transformed on the power landscape during Swain’s time as chief. During his final decade, as another POWER brief shows, Commonwealth Edison of Chicago—one of the oldest U.S. electric utilities—installed a computer to measure the electricity use of its 1.9 million customers and “regulate generator output.” That same brief notes that a massive solar thermal power station was under development in Armenia.

1950s:

The 1950s were marked by so many dazzling technical achievements in coal, gas, nuclear, and solar power technology, and POWER’s issues were crowded with important announcements and breakthroughs. One article declares: “Recent announcements reveal we’re at the start of a great stride forward in power-plant conditions—a move into the region far above the critical pressure. For years our attention centered on the steady advance of throttle temperature.” Another fascinating piece describes separate initiatives by General Electric and Westinghouse Electric Corp. to secure federal backing for construction of a large-capacity power reactor. Westinghouse’s full-scale 60-MW plant will cost “tens of millions of dollars,” POWER notes.

In the 1950s, POWER lost one of its longest-running chief editors, Philip Swain. Swain’s 20-year legacy remains part of a remarkable and significant feature of the magazine’s history, which is that it had only five editors-in-chief throughout its first 100 years of publication. So much would have transformed on the power landscape during Swain’s time as chief. During his final decade, as another POWER brief shows, Commonwealth Edison of Chicago—one of the oldest U.S. electric utilities—installed a computer to measure the electricity use of its 1.9 million customers and “regulate generator output.” That same brief notes that a massive solar thermal power station was under development in Armenia.