1920s_POWERExcerpt

1920s:  While it has always been at the forefront of power generation technology and business matters, POWER’s pages have also chronicled a changing social landscape. Shortly after women won a national right to vote, Ms. Celia Hobbs—sporting a finger-wave bob haircut, a symbol of the modern woman—opined that women seeking a “pleasant home, a well established place in the social life of her community and the advantages that accrue with such a life,” should consider marrying an engineer. While her reasons are outdated, and her piece feels out of place in a prestigious trade publication, it addresses women. We’d like to think it was to appeal to a new female set of POWER readers who joined the larger workforce after World War I, but federal statistics say only 38 women in 1930 worked as electricians or power station operators nationwide (a number that grew to 1,436 by 1940).

1920s:

While it has always been at the forefront of power generation technology and business matters, POWER’s pages have also chronicled a changing social landscape. Shortly after women won a national right to vote, Ms. Celia Hobbs—sporting a finger-wave bob haircut, a symbol of the modern woman—opined that women seeking a “pleasant home, a well established place in the social life of her community and the advantages that accrue with such a life,” should consider marrying an engineer. While her reasons are outdated, and her piece feels out of place in a prestigious trade publication, it addresses women. We’d like to think it was to appeal to a new female set of POWER readers who joined the larger workforce after World War I, but federal statistics say only 38 women in 1930 worked as electricians or power station operators nationwide (a number that grew to 1,436 by 1940).